Knowledge Management

ay Path College CIM 654 Knowledge Management SyllabusSemester/Dates: Session 6: Summer 2015 August 24, 2015 October 17, 2015 Professor: Sharon Olson, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor Meeting Hours: Wednesday, 6 10PM Office: Virtual Office Hours: By Appointment Telephone: Office: (413) 569-6397: Leave a message if needed Email: solson@baypath.edu solson@the-spa.com (preferred)Prerequisites None Course Credits: 3Introductory Comments:What happens to the data, information, and knowledge an organization collects over time? Where does it come from? How do we recognize the knowledge assets we possess? How are they measured, authenticated and protected? Well explore these questions and more, using a lot of examples from history, current events and your own career experiences. Knowledge management is no longer a new phenomenon. Likely where you work, knowledge management is now considered a fundamental building block to create a learning organization. Good practices in knowledge management recognize the need for every constituent within the organization to take responsibility for knowledge resources creating them, sharing them, and cultivating them. As a result, your understanding of what knowledge management is today will help you build your business into a strong and agile institution in our continuously changing world.Course DescriptionCIM 654 Knowledge Management is designed to develop the students understanding of how intellectual capital is created, shared, stored and manipulated. Students are required to do scholarly research on critical theories and applications of knowledge management in organizations. Special emphasis is placed on knowledge creation, the evaluation of knowledge as an organizational asset, and the transfer of knowledge within learning organizations. This course is presented in a combination of traditional and online class discussions and exercises.Student Learning Outcomes:To present concepts surrounding knowledge management within organizational environments and to explore, through text material, case studies, exercises and other resources, concepts and issues related to knowledge management concepts. The student will: Define knowledge management and articulate what it is and what it is not. Become familiar with the links between knowledge management, information management, business strategy, and data management. Investigate the theoretical frameworks of knowledge creation and issues knowledge management in a global economy. Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices. Determine how an organization assesses its knowledge and how an organization measures the return of investment (ROI) of knowledge management and review prevalent IT tools related to knowledge management Understand ethical and cultural issues inherent in the practice of knowledge managementRequired Texts:1. Thomas H. Davenport and Laurence Prusak, Working Knowledge: How organizations manage what they know, Harvard Business School Press (Boston, MA), 2000. ISBN: 1- 57851-301-4.These texts can be purchased from the Bay Path bookstore. Order online at efollett.com (click on the Find Your Bookstore link and choose state (MA) and then choose institution. When you get new page, select the Find Your Textbooks link and choose program, course number, and section number.Additional Readings:You are encouraged to use additional resources for this course. You will need to do research on your own for your weekly KM group presentations and the KM Hotspots issues for discussion for this course. The final class project will require collaborative research to present a KM proposal to me as your executive sponsor.All other (required and recommended) readings can be found in the appropriate weeks module of our Canvas course site.Course Teaching and Learning MethodsBecause this course is being taught in intensive format, it is very important for students to keep up with reading assignments and online discussions of the reading. Indeed, it is impossible to pass this course if you do not complete the required readings and assignments each and every week. Each weeks in-class discussion draws directly from the readings and each students participation should incorporate important points from the readings and the weekly KM Hotspots research in order to receive the maximum points. Responses need not only be directed to the instructor but can and should be in response to the thoughts and ideas of other students as well.Some assignments may be posted on-line for class member review and comments. Each student will provide constructive and timely feedback to other class members on assignments that are posted for class review and feedback. While the course instructor may also provide verbal feedback on assignments, grades for each course assignment will always be given privately.Important note: I see my role as your instructor as a learning facilitator. I hope that you will take primary responsibility for your own learning throughout this course.Course Schedule:This course is divided into eight weekly sessions and all must be attended. Each week students are expected to substantially participate with in-class discussions and the KM Hotspot topics as assigned. Additionally are weekly group presentation assignments of which a signup sheet will be passed around.A class or group [depending upon number of students enrolled] collaborative project will be required where a midterm milestone report will be given on week 4 and the final presentation of the ongoing collaborative project on week 8. There will be workshops on each week to assist with the planning and construction of each stage of this collaborative project- make sure to use this time efficiently.NO late assignments can be accepted.Individual AssignmentsWeek one will consist of a brief writing assignment on the Simile of the Cave and the Get-Ready Man.The weekly KM Hotspots assignments and the KM group presentations focus on the application of the key concepts of the course, and allow students to demonstrate their proficiency in these concepts.The individual weekly assignments (week 1 and week 8) can be found in this syllabus or on Canvas as needed. The KM group topics presentation description and signup sheet will be distributed on week one.The class collaborative project will span the entire 8 weeks of this course, and will include the typical elements of a KM proposal that would be presented to an executive sponsor or stakeholder. Each week- we will as a class [or separate groups if needed due to the number of students enrolled] participate in workshops to construct the elements of this proposal. A mid-term presentation is due on week four on the milestones achieved with this proposal with a recommended next steps, then a final presentation will be due on week 8 with the entire proposal. It is strongly recommended that students make their best efforts to attend each class for this reason alone.Instructor/Course PoliciesLate Work PolicyAll individual and group assignments must be submitted by the due date and time specified for the assignment in this syllabus. No exceptions.Any individual or group assignment not submitted by the due date and time will be considered late and will receive a grade of 0 points.It is the students responsibility to verify that individual and group assignments have been submitted correctly.Attendance/Participation PolicyIn the onsite classroom, students are expected to attend and actively participate on a regular basis as scheduled. In addition, students are expected to check Inbox/Conversations and the Announcements page in Canvas at least every other day.Turnitin.com Policy and ProcessStudents agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to submission for textual similarity review to Turnitin.com for the detection of plagiarism. All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers. Use of Turnitin.com service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the Turnitin.com site.The following statement must be submitted with each paper: I submit that this paper is entirely my own work and agree that it may be submitted to Turnitin for the purpose of checking for plagiarism and further that it may be maintained on the Turnitin database in order to check for future plagiarism.Statement on Academic Integrity:Academic integrity is vital to the learning process and dishonesty will not be tolerated. Any student who commits academic dishonesty will receive a sanction appropriate to the nature and severity of the violation and in accordance with the Policy on Academic Integrity, which appears in detail in the course catalog (available under Academics on the My Bay Path portal). If you are unclear as to what types of behaviors constitute academic dishonesty, talk with the course instructor. (The entire policy may be found at http://goo.gl/ft2Sps)A faculty member who has evidence of a student failing to adhere to the Academic Integrity Policy has a duty to report the conduct to the Office of Academic Affairs, which will maintain records of the allegation and the disposition of the matter. When conduct involving academic dishonesty occurs in the faculty members class, she or he may elect to attempt to resolve the matter informally, in which case the faculty member may assign the student a grade of F for the course and/or for the particular assignment, or grade so much of the assignment that represents the students own work, or require that the student repeat the assignment or a similar assignment. The faculty member may elect to refer the matter directly to Academic Affairs for disposition by the Standing Committee through a Hearing Board. The complete policy applicable to students in this course may be found at: http://goo.gl/OBDreAProcedures for Students with DisabilitiesAny student with an identified disability that may affect his/her performance in this class who seeks reasonable accommodations should schedule an appointment with the Coordinator of Student Academic Services as soon as possible at the beginning of the course so that provisions can be made to assure he/she has an equal opportunity to meet all the requirements of this course.If you have an identified disability that may affect your performance in this class and you choose to request reasonable accommodations, please schedule an appointment with Jemi Kuberski, Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities, by calling 413-565-1772 or emailing jkuberski@baypath.edu so that provisions can be made to assure you have an equal opportunity to meet all the requirements of this course.NOTE CONCERNING COLLEGE POLICIESImportant information on technology support, academic integrity, use of Turnitin.com, support for students with disabilities, and tutoring services may be found at: http://goo.gl/3R5Ewv Please review these policies carefully; you will be expected to be familiar with their content.On site Student Responsibilities: Attendance and presence are required for this class. You are expected to notify the instructor in advance as possible should your attendance be in question. The class collaborative project cannot be successfully completed otherwise. Although I suggest that all issues, questions, and problems be dealt with in class, you can feel free to call or e-mail me at any reasonable time. Keep in mind that others will learn from your questions. When taught in the on campus format, this class meets for 4 hours per week. You should expect to spend the seat time of 4 hours, plus approximately 2 hours for every hour of course time for a grand total of approximately 12 hours per week on course responsibilities (e.g. reading, assignments, online discussion). If you dont have this amount of time to devote to the class, you should not enroll. Remember that its essential to keep open, clear communication within the course. If an issue arises that affects your participation in class, please let me know right away. Also, remember that much of the learning in an on-site course is collaborative learning. If you are absent, this will have an impact on others in the class.Course Instructor Responsibilities: The course instructor will design the course and learning modules in such a way that students have every opportunity to achieve the learning outcomes. While the course instructor may not lead the class discussion, the instructor will provide reactions to student responses and discussion as appropriate in order to clarify important ideas and concepts. The course instructor will read and critically assess students assignments and provide feedback within 7 days of the assignments due date. The course instructor will respond to all student inquiries within 24 hours, Monday Saturday.Tutoring ServicesFree online tutoring services are available through Smarthinking. To access their site, go to the Bay Path Connect portal and click on Online Tutoring button on the top left of the page. Live, real-time tutoring is available in many subjects and there is also a writing service that allows you to submit a paper and receive feedback within 24 hours. Please visit the site and plan ahead if you wish to utilize this service as real-time tutoring hours vary by subject. Any technology issues relating to the use of Smarthinking should be sent to ITS at ITS@baypath.edu; all other questions on Smarthinking should be directed to the Bashevkin Center for Academic Excellence.Methods for Determining Final GradeEvaluation of Student LearningAt the completion of this course, you will receive a letter grade reflecting your performance in this course. Letter grades (from A F) will be computed for each of the above items based on the percentage earned. Your percentage total is then converted to a letter grade according to the following scale:Letter Grade Equivalent: Percentage Earned: Grade Point: A 95-100 4.00 A- 90-94 3.67 B+ 87-89 3.33 B 83-86 3.00 B- 80-82 2.67 C 70-79 2.00 F Below 70 0.00 I None 0.00 W None 0.00Tutoring ServicesFree online tutoring services are available through Smarthinking. To access their site, go to the Bay Path Connect portal and click on Online Tutoring button on the top left of the page. Live, real-time tutoring is available in many subjects and there is also a writing service that allows you to submit a paper and receive feedback within 24 hours. Please visit the site and plan ahead if you wish to utilize this service as real-time tutoring hours vary by subject. Any technology issues relating to the use of Smarthinking should be sent to ITS at ITS@baypath.edu.Types of AssignmentsClasses will include lecture notes, classroom discussion and written assignments, and students presentations of assigned research from outside of course materials. When assignments are not submitted on time or are not completed in appropriate manner, the instructor will not grade them and no points will be awarded toward your final grade. Excellent work on assignments will be awarded full points. Poorly prepared work on assignments will be awarded fewer points. It is to your advantage to prepare assignments carefully and to proofread your work. All written assignments are due as listed in the course schedule. Your active participation in class is expected and will, in a great part, determine the pace we use to present and complete course content.RubricsAll assignments are expected to conform to APA Version 6 formatting standards. This includes the format of the document, the citation of references and the presentation of graphs, tables, and the like. Students are expected to be familiar with APA standards. Assignments will be graded in part on adherence to format guidelines.Written assignments and essays should be double-spaced, 12 point font, and should be submitted as a Word document (.Doc or .Docx) format. Work submitted as an Excel spreadsheet should be in .xls or .xlsx format and be formatted for appropriate printing. Work submitted as a PowerPoint should be in .ppt or .pptx format.All assignments submitted should be of professional quality, substantially free of typos, grammatical errors, and the like, should be in compliance with APA format and should meet the content requirements as specified in this syllabus. A technical assessment and content assessment will be performed on all assignments, forums, etc. Points may be deducted for failure to meet either technical or content requirements. The highest grades (e.g. A) will be given to work meeting these standards. Submitted work lacking in some areas will receive a lesser grade (e.g. B). The grade will be reduced further (e.g. C) for work submitted that is lacking in many areas. Submitted work that is entirely inadequate and/or not of Masters quality will receive a failing grade. It must be obvious from your participation and submissions that you have read and that you comprehend the assigned readings for the week.Course OutlineCourse Outline Each week begins on the evening class meets. Materials submitted later than midnight the following week may not be graded. If you are experiencing a situation that may cause a delay in submission of an assignment or your participation in weekly discussions, you are responsible for notifying the instructor as soon as you can. Please note that the course ends at midnight on October 17, which is a Saturday. All assignments to be graded need to meet this deadline.Assignment Points in Total1. Discussion Participation/KM Hotspots 30 maximum points possibleYou will do individual research on the KM Hotspot topic of the week and present the results to the class for interesting questions and debate.2. KM Group Project 30 maximum points possibleEach group will present a lecture to the class on the assigned topic as scheduled on the sign up list.3. Reflection on the Simile of the Cave 10 maximum points possibleFor week one, each student will write a brief reflection on the meaning of the Simile of the Cave and the Get-Ready Man in terms of the importance of knowledge and how it is perceived.4. Class Collaborative Project: Mid-Term/Final 30 maximum points possibleFrom the weekly workshops, the class or student groups [depending upon the number of students enrolled will present a Mid-Term milestone proposal on week 4 worth 15 points, and an appended final on week 8 worth another 15 points.Week #1: What is knowledge and how do we learn? August 24We begin our study of Knowledge Management by defining terms and considering learning happens. To help us with these tasks, we will relate our study to Platos Simile of the Cave and James Thurbers Get-Ready Man. Activities this week will help us distinguish tacit and explicit knowledge.Student Learning Objectives: Define knowledge management and articulate what it is and what it is not.Required Readings: Article for this week (in the course weeks module) McIntyre, N. H., Harvey, M., & Moeller, M. (2012). The Role of Managerial Curiosity in Organizational Learning: A Theoretical Inquiry. International Journal Of Management, 659-676.Assignments for Week 1:1. Prepare and submit your entry paper on the Simile of the Cave. Is there a connection between the Simile of the Cave and how you think people learn and perceive knowledge? 2. Sign up for your KM Group topics presentation. 3. Bring in an example from your own research of a Knowledge Management process that appears to be working well for a business or other organization and share with the class on why you think it works.___________________________________________________Week #2: Measuring what we know and Knowledge Maps September 1 September 7, 2014This week we will focus on personal knowledge management. We will review the concepts of tacit and explicit knowledge and consider six steps toward personal knowledge management. Our activities this week will focus on creating concept (knowledge) maps and lifelines as tools.Student Learning Objectives: Define knowledge management and articulate what it is and what it is not. Become familiar with the links between knowledge management, information management, business strategy, and data management.Required Readings: Article for this week Hornett, Andrea; Stein, Eric W. (2007), Mapping the Knowledge Management Domain of Ideas: Evidence from a Practice Group. International Journal of Knowledge Management3 (Jul-Sep 2007): 1-8,10-25. Video for this week: TED Tom Wujec video 3 Ways the Brain Creates MeaningAssignments for Week 2: 1. History of KM group presentation topic due this week! 2. Bring in an example from your research on what Knowledge Management methodology appears to be experiencing implementation problems for a business or other organization and why do you think that problems did occur?___________________________________________________Week #3: Stories, Metaphors and Bricolage September 8 September 14, 2014This week we focus on storytelling as a knowledge management tool. We will transform our lifelines into stories and consider how bricolage and metaphors fit into our discussion of knowledge management.Student Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the links between knowledge management, information management, business strategy, and data management. Investigate the theoretical frameworks of knowledge creation and issues knowledge management in a global economy. Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices.Required Readings: Davenport and Prusak, Chapters 1,2,and 3 Assigned article for this week: Hannabuss, S. (2000). Narrative knowledge: Eliciting organisational knowledge from storytelling. Aslib Proceedings, 52(10), 402-402.Assignments for Week 3: 1. What is Knowledge? Group KM Presentation due this week! 2. Bring in an example from your research on how an organization implemented a knowledge management methodology and both the reason why and what goals that the organization strives to achieve. Do you think the implementation plan will be sustainable?___________________________________________________Week #4: Systems thinking and social knowledge management September 15 September 21, 2014Well spend time this week constructing causal loops and investigating various types of knowledge architectures. We will focus our attention on systems thinking and include in our discussion the latest trend in knowledge management, social knowledge management.Student Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the links between knowledge management, information management, business strategy, and data management. Investigate the theoretical frameworks of knowledge creation and issues knowledge management in a global economy. Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices.Required Readings: Davenport and Prusak, Chapters 4,5, and 6 Article for this week: Mirvis, P. (2008). Executive Development Through Consciousness-Raising Experiences. Academy Of Management Learning & Education, 7(2), 173-188.Assignments for Week 4: 1. Class Collaborative Mid-Term presentation due this week! 2. What are Communities of Practice? Group presentation due this week.! 3. Bring in an example from your research on storytelling and how an organization used this method to collect practice knowledge from those who know. Do you think storytelling is effective? ___________________________________________________Week #5: Organizational models and KM September 22 September 28, 2014This week were looking at models of organizations and also at how communication is done in various organizational structures. Well consider the importance of listening as well as communicating.Student Learning Objectives: Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices. Determine how an organization assesses its knowledge and how an organization measures the return of investment (ROI) of knowledge management and review prevalent IT tools related to knowledge managementRequired Readings: Article for this week: Zack, M. Rethinking the Knowledge Based Organization. (2003). MIT Sloan Management Review. McManus, D., Wilson, L., Snyder, C. (2003). Assessing the Business Value of Knowledge Retention Projects: Results of Four Case StudiesAssignments for Week 5: 1. How Does KM Transfer Knowledge? Group presentation due this week! 2. Bring in an example from your research on how KM may have influenced the innovation of a business or other organization. Did using KM to spark innovation have an impact beyond the immediate goal?___________________________________________________Week #6: Ethical Issues with KM September 29 October 5, 2104This week were looking at ethical issues that involve knowledge management practices and theory. How do we define these issues and how does the way in which we make our definitions shape our solutions. Along with the discussion, we will also consider how ethical issues centering on information and data have changed over the yearsStudent Learning Objectives: Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices. Understand ethical and cultural issues inherent in the practice of knowledge managementRequired Readings: Davenport and Prusak, Chapters 7,8 and 9 Weinberger, D. Your Help with the New ExpertiseAssignments for Week 6: 1. When KM can Fail! Group Presentation due this week! 2. Bring in an example from your research on how Big Data can impact KM operations. How can organizations be sure that the data needed is there amongst the sheer volume of information? ___________________________________________________Week #7: Tools of the trade October 6 October 12, 2014This week we will look at how an organization determines the value associated with its knowledge management assets. We will review prevalent IT tools that are used to manage these assets and we will revisit some of the more significant problems and issues that are now facing knowledge management practices.Student Learning Objectives: Become familiar with the links between knowledge management, information management, business strategy, and data management. Investigate the theoretical frameworks of knowledge creation and issues knowledge management in a global economy. Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices. Determine how an organization assesses its knowledge and how an organization measures the return of investment (ROI) of knowledge management and review prevalent IT tools related to knowledge management Understand ethical and cultural issues inherent in the practice of knowledge managementRequired Readings: Ear, M. J., & Scott, I. A. (1999). What is a chief knowledge officer?. Sloan Management Review, 40(2), 29-38.Assignments for Week 7: 1. The Future of KM Group Presentation due this week! 2. Bring in some research on which Chief Knowledge Officer you admire and why. Would you follow that persons strategic vision or suggest some alternatives? We will use this to prepare for next weeks topic of discussion. ___________________________________________________Week #8: What does it take to be a CKO? October 13 October 18, 2014This final week were considering the requirements of the role of Chief Knowledge Officer. When did the role first become popular and what exactly does a CKO do? Well be putting our investigation into the contexts of a variety of organizational cultures.Student Learning Objectives: Discuss how organizational assets in knowledge are created, how they are developed, how they are stored by an organization, and how individuals within the organization contribute to these processes, including collaborative and organizational learning practices. Understand ethical and cultural issues inherent in the practice of knowledge managementRequired Readings: Articles for this week: Bontis, N. The Rising Star of the Chief Knowledge Officer Michaels, P, & Spain E. Knowledge Shared is Power Reid, C. KM at Work: A look at how organizations maximize knowledge to deliver results Vertal, M. Focus on Rivit Logic.Assignments for Week 8:1. Final Class Collaborative Proposal presentations are due this week!DisclaimerThe professor reserves the right to change class assignments and/or projects or activities at his/her discretion after advance notification. It is the responsibility of the student to stay informed via BPC email and your Canvas classroom.A Word about the CIM CapstonePlease make sure you keep copies of the written assignments and reflective discussions from this course. Youll find that these may be beneficial to demonstrate application and learning objectives when you complete CIM Cap